SPECT Scan (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography)

SPECT scans are similar to PET scans. They use a special camera to make 3-dimensional images of inside the body. SPECT scans are effective for getting information about blood flow to tissues and chemical reactions in the body. SPECT scans are often used for diagnosing and monitoring treatment for brain tumors and cancers affecting bones.

SPECT scans are done by injecting a small amount of radioactive isotope, or tracer, into a vein. The tracer travels to places in the body where there is tumor activity. After the tracer is injected your child will have to lie very still on the SPECT scanner table while pictures are taken.

Be sure to ask about what instructions are needed to prepare for the SPECT Scan. For instance, there are special dietary instructions to follow and there may be additional instructions if your child needs sedation.

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